Personalisation – from mass to me

A friend recounted an interesting story last week. He was looking to switch his internet service provider (ISP) so he reviewed what was on offer. After a bit of online research he decided to switch provider. A week after the switch he received a call, on his landline phone, from one of the ISPs he had considered. They said (and I’m paraphrasing here); “we’ve noticed you’ve been looking at our internet packages online, can we make you an offer?”.

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Opening up banking data to stimulate innovation and growth

A recent report by the ODI and the Fingleton Associates explored how competition and consumer value could be stimulated by providing UK customers with their own bank transaction data. The idea is that if banks open up their customer’s transaction data via an API and OAuth, a competitive market would emerge generating new economic, business and customer value. What interested me most was the different ways this data can be used:

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This is why I support Wikipedia

A powerful thank you letter from Wikipedia for small donation. This is why I support open web non-profits like this. If you share the same values and have some spare cash, I would encourage anyone to do the same.

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New complexities as a consequence of deeper digital engagement

Like many people, I’m deeply reliant on the internet. Having grown up with it over the years, I’ve transferred more and more of my offline life, online. This shift has largely been driven by convenience and I absolutely believe I can get more done online, especially with my smartphone, than I could offline. However, as this has been a gradual migration, I have not, until now, noticed the inherent inefficiencies of doing ‘stuff’ online. Using the internet should be far more convenient and manageable than it currently is. It’s only when I stepped back and evaluated my own online behaviours that this became evident. Here are my biggest gripes with using the internet today:

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Blackphone could provoke consumers to question their trust in technology brands

In June this year, a new smartphone called Blackphone, will go on sale to the public. The emergence of a ‘privacy first’ smartphone could cause consumers to question how established mobile providers protect their personal data. Products and services developed with privacy at its core are likely to foster a deeper sense of trust with internet users. That’s what Phil Zimmermann, one of the founders of Blackphone hopes. In MIT’s Technology Review, he differentiates Blackphone from other smartphone companies:

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How our environment impacts our productivity

With a pile of work, no Internet connection at home and a bustling agile office environment, I found myself at a serene and surprisingly productive pay-as-you-go work space: Ziferblat. I’d heard about this place after reading this Guardian article late last year and had wanted to visit ever since. Today, I finally made it (just! it’s difficult to find), and found the atmosphere extremely conducive to a productive day’s work.

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The emergence of networked commerce and a new wave of business models

The networked world we live in is still in its infancy. The mass adoption of digital networked technology is transformative, but we are still only scratching the surface of what is possible. The behaviours that the network enables – like sharing, communicating, collaborating and learning – come naturally to people. The organization which operates closed, scarcity-based business models has found, or will find, the open and abundant nature of the network disruptive.

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Why the personal data economy is an important trend for businesses & citizens

Back in 2011, the World Economic Forum (WEF) compared personal data to oil [1], as an asset class of extraordinary economic value. Oil was central to the development of the industrial revolution. Without it, much of the infrastructure we take for granted today (transport, energy, etc.) would not have been realized. Presently, personal data is the lifeblood of the information age and central to everyone’s day-to-day connected digital experience. As we move further into 2014, the debate around how we implement the fair use of personal data will gather momentum.

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